Ivory Halo Dogwood

Cornus alba 'Bailhalo'

Growzone: 3-7

As Low As $54.95
1. Choose Size & Quantity
Size Price Quantity
3 GAL $54.95
2. Choose Recommended Add-Ons
Product Price Quantity
Espoma Bio-Tone Plus Starter Plus $14.95
Espoma Holly-Tone $12.95
Treegator Jr. Slow Release Watering Bag $25.95
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This Plants Growzone: 3-7
Growing Zone: 3-7
Mature Height: 5 – 6 feet
Mature Width: 5 – 6 feet
Classification: Deciduous shrub
Sunlight: Full Sun to part shade
Habit: Deciduous, densely branched, multi-stemmed clump forming
Flower Color: Fragrant White flowers in mid to late spring through early summer.
Foliage: Variegated.
Soil Condition: Any well drained soil but will tolerate “wet feet”
Water Require: Water well until established.
uses: Extremely attractive when used as a focal point in the mixed border, mass planting, or a specimen planting. Provides unmatched winter interest especially when planted in front of a contrasting backdrop.

Ivory Halo Dogwood for Sale Online


Treasured for its colorful stems, multi-colored foliage, and small stature, the Ivory Halo Dogwood has been used to provide flare in shrub borders and mass plantings. It has vibrant red winter stems that give it a distinguished look in the fall and winter.


Planting Information

We suggest when planting your newly purchased Ivory Halo Dogwood plants that you dig a hole twice as wide as the root system but not deeper. Depending on the quality of your existing soil you may need to add a locally sourced compost or topsoil to the back-fill soil. We do not recommend using straight topsoil or compost as a back-fill soil because more times than not these products will retain entirely to much moisture and will cause the root system to rot. Adding compost or topsoil will help the young feeder roots to spread through the loose, nutrient rich soil, much easier than if you used solely the existing soil which more times than not will be hard and compacted. The most common cause of plant death after transplanting is planting the new plant to deep. That is why we do not recommend planting in a hole any deeper than the soil line of the plant in the pot. A good rule is that you should still be able to see the soil the plant was grown in after back-filling the hole. Bio-tone starter fertilizer is a great starter fertilizer that provides plants with mycorrhizae fungus. It is a naturally occurring beneficial fungus that colonizes on the new growing roots of plants. It creates a barrier between the roots of the plant and fungus and pathogens that can cause root rot. We love this product and use it on all plants we install in our own gardens. Bio-tone is a gardeners best friend and can help guarantee your success.


Frequently Asked questions

when should I water?

what type of mulch should I use for my ivory halo dogwood?

when should I fertilize my dogwood?

what time should I be pruning my halo dogwood?


Customer Reviews

Additional Information

Cornus is the Latin word for horn (like a unicorn). The Romans called the dogwood “cornel”, in reference to its wood, which is hard as the horn of a goat and useful for making a great many things. This is also a convenient way to remember the distinct leaf buds of Ivory Halo dogwood, which are narrow and pointed like horns. The species name sericea means silky, in reference to the fine hairs covering the leaves. The origin of the word “dogwood” itself is not totally settled. It may be a corruption of “dagwood”, from the use of its hard wood in making dags (or daggers). Alternatively, there is some evidence that a concoction of English Cornus leaves was used to treat dog mange in 17th century herbology. C. sericea is also commonly known as redosier dogwood. This may be confusing, since “osier” comes from the medieval term for willow (Salix sp.) In fact, the flexible young branches of C. sericea have long been used for basket weaving, much like the willows that grow in similar stream side thickets. Like most of our native plant species, dogwood has been, and continues to be, valued for its many benefits to humans. An extract made from the leaves, stems and inner bark can be used as an emetic for treating fevers and coughs (and a great many other ailments), and the inner bark scrapings have long been added to tobacco smoking mixtures. The red stems not only produce colorful weaving patterns, but can be used to make red, brown and black dyes.Cornus is the Latin word for horn (like a unicorn). The Romans called the dogwood “cornel”, in reference to its wood, which is hard as the horn of a goat and useful for making a great many things. This is also a convenient way to remember the distinct leaf buds of Ivory Halo dogwood, which are narrow and pointed like horns. The species name sericea means silky, in reference to the fine hairs covering the leaves. The origin of the word “dogwood” itself is not totally settled. It may be a corruption of “dagwood”, from the use of its hard wood in making dags (or daggers). Alternatively, there is some evidence that a concoction of English Cornus leaves was used to treat dog mange in 17th century herbology. C. sericea is also commonly known as redosier dogwood. This may be confusing, since “osier” comes from the medieval term for willow (Salix sp.) In fact, the flexible young branches of C. sericea have long been used for basket weaving, much like the willows that grow in similar stream side thickets. Like most of our native plant species, dogwood has been, and continues to be, valued for its many benefits to humans. An extract made from the leaves, stems and inner bark can be used as an emetic for treating fevers and coughs (and a great many other ailments), and the inner bark scrapings have long been added to tobacco smoking mixtures. The red stems not only produce colorful weaving patterns, but can be used to make red, brown and black dyes.