Crape Myrtle Shrubs for Sale Online

Originally native to Asia, Crape Myrtles have been the South’s favorite shrub for many years. Through development and manipulation, new versions have been released that allow northern gardeners the same satisfaction. New cultivars are less susceptible to colder conditions, pest and disease resistant, and their size can range from under 3 feet to over 40.

The classic beauty of the Crape Myrtle fits flawlessly with both formal and informal landscapes. With a long growing season, the flowers bloom in spring and once again in the fall. It is a perfect addition to enhance your curb appeal and add some color to your yard.

What are the Benefits of Buying Crepe Myrtle Shrubs?

Originally native to Asia, Crape Myrtles have been the South’s favorite shrub for many years. Through development and manipulation, new versions have been released that allow northern gardeners the same satisfaction. New cultivars are less susceptible to colder conditions, pest and disease resistant, and their size can range from under 3 feet to over 40.

The classic beauty of the Crape Myrtle fits flawlessly with both formal and informal landscapes. With a long growing season, the flowers bloom in spring and once again in the fall. It is a perfect addition to enhance your curb appeal and add some color to your yard.

They work well when used in pots on patios, along driveways or walkways, or in a mixed garden. These flowering trees come in shades of white, pink, violet, or red. The vibrant blooms are accented by oblong, dark, green leaves.

Once the flowering begins in late spring, small, seeded fruits form in the center of the blooms. Even after the summer flowers fall away, the leaves transform into yellow, orange, and red. By winter this deciduous shrub sheds its foliage and the smooth, light brown bark has its time to shine, giving this tree year-round interest.

How to Buy the Right Crape Myrtle for Your Landscape?

Crepe Myrtles come in different shapes, sizes, and colors. Some grow larger than others, and some are ideal for smaller spaces. Take a look at our three tips below for how to buy a Crape Myrtle Shrub online:

1. Match your grow zone to the subspecies

First and foremost, find out what grow zone you live in and which Crepe Myrtles will grow best there. Original versions flourish in the southern heat, but new developments have allowed the plants to better withstand colder, northern climates.

2. Map out the space on your property

While Crepe Myrtle Trees are glorious in their own regard, sometimes there just is not enough space for their vast growth. Rather than pruning aggressively to limit overgrowth, the 18-inch tall Crepe Myrtle Shrub is a perfect alternative.

3. Create a cohesive design

If you are looking to build a privacy hedge, a medium-sized Crape Myrtle Shrub is your best option. They can grow up to 6 feet and when lined up, will provide a soft solution to a need for privacy. It is generally most aesthetically pleasing when Crape Myrtles of the same color is chosen.

Other than that, the only choice you have to make is color. Cultivars have been created in a wide range of colors such as pink, red, white, and purple.

How to Care for a Crape Myrtle Shrub

Planting

When planting your Crape Myrtle Shrub in a garden, dig a hole that is twice as wide as the root ball of the shrub; the depth of the hole should be no deeper. If your hole is too deep, suckers will more prominently form as the shrub grows. Fill your hole with the same soil that was removed from the hole. If your preferred area lacks nutrients, mix compost, or manure with the soil in the area before planting your shrub.

If you choose to plant your Crepe Myrtle in a pot, choose a container that is slightly larger than the one the plant came in. This will allow the roots to grow as the plant establishes. It is equally as important to choose a pot that has multiple drainage holes at the bottom to drain excess water and prevent root rot.

This shrub can tolerate many growing conditions, but will flower best when in certain conditions:

Soil

The most important factor when it comes to optimal soil for your Crape Myrtle is that it is well-draining, while able to retain some moisture. Other than that, it tolerates most soil types including clay, loom, sand, acidic, or alkaline.

For outstanding results, the pH of the soil should be 5.0 to 6.5, although this acidity will not affect the color of the flowers. When planting in a pot, choose a rich, all-purpose potting mix. It should also be noted that crape myrtles are not typically invasive, so they should be spaced from other plants that will threaten their space.

Sun

For optimal flowering, plant your Crape Myrtle Shrub in full sun and where it will not have to compete for the sun with taller trees. Long periods of shade will reduce the volume of blooms and the overall growth of your shrub. In the same way, it makes the plant vulnerable to complications such as sooty mold or powdery mildew.

Watering

Although Crepe Myrtles are famously drought-tolerant, watering is still a necessity. To help the tree retain moisture after watering, apply a layer of organic mulch surrounding the trunk of the shrub. Leave a small gap to prevent rot.

When establishing your plant, water several times a week. For Crepe Myrtle Shrubs, this establishment period typically lasts several months to a year depending on the size of the shrub. Well established plants need to be watered weekly. This is especially important in hot and dry climates.

To test if your shrub needs water, stick your finger in the soil, 2 knuckles deep, and water if the soil is dry.

Potted plants typically dry out more often. To combat this, they must be watered several times a week, or even daily. Fill the pot with water until it trickles through the drainage holes at the bottom of the pot.

Fertilization

A common myth about Crape Myrtles is that you need to fertilize them in order to have abundant flowering. In fact, over-fertilization will promote leafy growth, which in turn will reduce the production of blossoms.

If you do opt for a fertilizer, use a general-purpose blend and spread evenly among the base of your shrub. Similar to mulch, be sure to leave a gap between the fertilizer and the trunk of the plant. The ideal time to apply is in early spring; one annual application in plenty with established shrubs.

With younger plants, you can apply once a month throughout the spring and summer, but it is paramount that you use a much smaller amount than you would with established plants. After fertilizing, give your plants plenty of water.

For potted plants, use a slow-release fertilizer throughout the spring, but stop 2 months before temperatures are expected to reach freezing overnight.

Pruning

Since Crape Myrtles bloom on new wood, many people believe that pruning will promote flowering. However, the opposite is actually true. Aggressive pruning can attract aphids and diseases that will hinder your plant’s growth.

One of the general reasons to prune is to control the size of your plant. The good news is that since these shrubs are already a smaller version of the Crepe Myrtle Trees, they are generally already compact.

The only pruning you need to do when caring for your plant is when there is dead growth, branches intertwining or crowded, or when a branch is growing towards the trunk of the shrub. In addition, you should remove limbs growing from below the ground, also known as suckers. We also recommend that before you prune, you clean your tools with isopropyl alcohol to prevent disease spread between plants while pruning.